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Mission, Vision & Values

Mission

Students & GCC staff making foodAs an inclusive, accessible, student-centered community college, we foster exceptional teaching and learning opportunities that result in intellectual and social growth, economic advancement, and engaged citizenship.

Vision

GCC will be the college of choice, known for its highly innovative and individualized educational experiences, life-long learning opportunities, and ability to empower students to lead in a changing world.

Values

In order to offer the highest quality academic experience and maintain a welcoming environment to all students and staff, GCC holds the following core values that we express in both the classroom and our daily lives:

  • Community - We commit to effective collaboration and open communication; we are united by our shared purpose and we value our connections with the broader community in which we serve.
  • Diversity - We embrace the uniqueness of all individuals and groups for their ability to enrich every aspect of our teaching and learning environment.     
  • Integrity - We adhere to high ethical standards and practices; we value honesty, fairness, and transparency in all endeavors. 
  • Learning - We foster a creative, innovative, and collaborative environment that stimulates academic achievement and life-long learning.
  • Opportunity - We invest in student access, equity, and success to support individual growth, development, and advancement; we value each community member’s distinctive potential and capacity to contribute.
  • Respect - We strive for civility, courtesy, and thoughtfulness, while recognizing and appreciating different points of view.Framing Our Future Logo

Current Institution-level Student Learning Outcomes (ISLOs)

Upon graduation from a degree program at Genesee Community College, students will have acquired the following skills and knowledge:

1. Communication Skills

Graduates demonstrate essential skills necessary to communicate ideas clearly and precisely. Some examples of how graduates demonstrate essential skills necessary to communicate ideas clearly and precisely:

  • Communicate in ways considered coherently and effectively within the frames or structures of the discourse standards of the given field or discipline—orally, textually, and artifactually—to a variety of chosen audiences deemed reasonable in range to the course or larger field of study.
  • Apply methodical analytic and interpretive strategies to a variety of texts (oral, visual).
  • Produce and revise texts for communication considered effective within the discourse standards of a given field or discipline.
  • Demonstrate basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language.

2. Scientific and Mathematical Reasoning

Graduates demonstrate scientific and/or mathematical reasoning in problem solving. Some examples of how graduates demonstrate scientific and/or mathematical reasoning in problem solving:

  • Apply methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
  • Apply scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural (or physical) sciences.
  • Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
  • Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
  • Employ quantitative methods such as, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
  • Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
  • Recognize the limits of mathematical and statistical methods.

3. Information Literacy and Technology

Graduates use various inquiry tools and different formats to search for information that enhances the acquisition of knowledge. Some examples of how graduates use various inquiry tools and different formats to search for information that enhances the acquisition of knowledge:

  • Perform the basic operations of personal computer use.
  • Use basic research techniques.
  • Locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources.
  • Use strategies to find, evaluate, interpret, manage, and use information for school, work, and the communities in which they live.
  • Appraise sources by critically examining evidence and by asking relevant questions.
  • Share insights or knowledge with others in their field or discipline, and/or participate in the conversation of scholarship.
  • Access and use information and technology ethically, legally, and responsibly in online environments.

4. Creative and Critical Thinking

Graduates engage in critical analysis and creative problem solving. Some examples of how graduates engage in critical analysis and creative problem solving:

  • Apply knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program
  • Use at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  • Model a method social scientists use to explore social phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments as they occur in their own or others’ work develop well-reasoned arguments.
  • Embrace contradictions, generate novel or unique ideas, approaches or solutions to problems and challenges.
  • Connect, synthesize and transform solutions in novel ways, into a coherent whole and/or into entirely new forms.

5. Global Citizenship and Wellness in a Diverse World

Graduates explore the relevance of current and historical human interconnectedness. Some examples of how graduates explore the relevance of current and historical human interconnectedness:

  • Examine a basic narrative of American history: political, economic, social, and cultural, including knowledge of unity and diversity in American society.
  • Analyze common institutions in American society and how they have affected different groups.
  • Explain America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc., of Western civilization.
  • Relate the development of Western civilization to that of other regions of the world.
  • Describe either a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc., of one non-Western civilization.
  • Apply concepts, models and issues of at least one discipline in the social sciences.
  • Apply knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  • Identify the components of a healthy lifestyle.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the activities that promote fitness and well-being through physical activity over the life span.
  • Demonstrate knowledge regarding the fact that mental and physical health are affected by an individual's ability to avoid or adapt to stress, emotional factors, and tension.
  • Describe and manage their personal and community resources to engage in physical activity.