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Fall 2018

Chemistry Courses:

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CHE100 - Introduction to Chemistry

Credits: 3

Catalog Description: An introduction to general, organic and biological chemistry, with an emphasis on applications that are relevant to students pursuing health science programs. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, chemical and physical bonding, gas properties, chemical reactions, acid/base chemistry, organic molecule structure and functional groups, and common groups of biological molecules (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins). Two class hours, two lab hours. Not open to students with credits in, BIO 115, BIO 116, CHE 101 or PHY 131. Prerequisite: Completion of the Genesee Community College math requirement or concurrent enrollment in MAT 092 or MAT108. Students planning to enroll in Physical Therapy Assistant or a Mathematics or Natural Science program should choose MAT092.

Lecture: 2 hrs.

Lab: 2 hrs.

Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs):
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1. Apply the dimensional analysis method to convert between units and to solve chemistry problems.
2. Use the nuclear symbol to determine the number of protons, neutrons and electrons, and distinguish between atoms, ions and isotopes.
3. Determine the number of valence electrons and stability of atoms and monatomic ions.
4. Rank the boiling points of two molecules by describing the chemical bonding, shape, polarity and intermolecular forces of each molecule.
5. Identify which bonds are broken or formed during a phase change or dissolution.
6. Explain what is occurring at the molecular level that causes a change in the pressure or volume measurement of a gas.
7. Utilize the concepts of molecular weight, molarity and chemical equations to determine the amount of product formed from a given amount of reactants.
8. Prepare a solution of a desired concentration and volume.
9. Describe how pH relates to the concentration of an acid or base solution (qualitatively for weak acids and bases).
10. Draw the structural formula and identify functional groups for a line-angle (skeletal) formula.
11. Determine if a molecule is a carbohydrate, lipid or protein and explain by identifying the functional groups.
12. Build a 3D model from a Fischer projection. Show why two enantiomers would have different reactivity with a chiral receptor.
13. Apply data, concepts and models related to the content areas of this course.*
14. Explore natural phenomena through observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.*

* This course objective has been identified as a student learning outcome that must be formally assessed as part of the Comprehensive Assessment Plan of the college. All faculty teaching this course must collect the required data and submit the required analysis and documentation at the conclusion of the semester to the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment.

* This course objective has been identified as a student learning outcome that must be formally assessed as part of the Comprehensive Assessment Plan of the college. All faculty teaching this course must collect the required data and submit the required analysis and documentation at the conclusion of the semester to the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment.


Content Outline:
1. Math and measurement - dimensional analysis method; measurement and uncertainty
2. Atoms and monatomic ions - nuclear model, atomic number, mass number and isotopes
3. Compounds - ionic vs molecular bonding, Lewis structure, shape and polarity
4. Intermolecular Forces - chemical vs physical bonding; types of physical bonding; molecular level view of phase changes
5. Gases - molecular theory of gases; properties
6. Chemical reactions - atom rearrangement, compound ratio, mass to mole conversion, stoichiometry
7. Solutions - molecular level view of solubility; concentration units
8. Acids and bases- strong vs weak, pH, acid-base neutralization reactions.
9. Organic chemistry intro - structural and skeletal formulas, polarity and physical properties
10. Organic functional groups - overview of primary groups, select reactions
11. Organic molecules - 3 dimensional structure - examples showing isomers and chirality
12. Biochemistry - carbohydrates, lipids and proteins - identification of molecules and functional groups; Fischer projections and 3D structures; chirality

Effective Term: Fall 2015