Skip to Content

Please write your suggestion or question in the box below
(Please note: Links to websites are not allowed. If you include a link to a website, your submission will be rejected.):

 

Feedback Forum

Responses to previous Suggestions & Questions submitted by library users

Suggestion:
Is it possible to create more study room space? Currently there are only four available and with the more and more assignments that require groups participation makes it difficult when there is nowhere else on campus to study or do.

Response:
Thanks for sending us your suggestion.  We would LOVE to add more group study spaces in the library, and completely agree with your observations that more assignments call for group work, and that current rooms are in constant good use. Adding such space is a high facilities priority for the library, and we have been working diligently to raise awareness of this need. The Board of Trustees recently approved the new college facilities master plan, and the need for renovation to existing space and the development of a Learning Commons, where such study spaces would be included, are included in the plan. So, we are hopeful that we'll be able to reconfigure and then design library's spaces in both near term and long term ways as the projects in that plan are implemented. Alas, this is not an immediate solution, and our physical realities of brick walls and the concrete slab allow for little “easy” additions of rooms. We do see the Media Room, the table in the legal area increasingly used for group study when noise levels can suit the groups’ tasks.

We really appreciate you taking the time to write to us about this concern.  We truly welcome student input.

Nina Warren, Director of Library Services
May 2013


Suggestion:
I've noticed that the graphic novel collection is getting bigger but I think you're still missing some pretty important ones. Here are some recommendations:

Summer Blonde by Adrian Tomine
Shortcomings by Adrian Tomine
Hey, Wait...by Jason ---
Stitches by David Small
The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir by Laurie Sandell
Locas: A Love and Rockets Book by Jamie Hernandez
Embroideries by Marjane Satrapi
Box Office Poison by Alex Robinson
The Plain Janes by Cecil Castellucci

Response:
At this time we would be happy to order the highly reviewed Summer Blonde by Toumine and Embroideries by Satrapi, a follow-up to her acclaimed Persepolis books which we hold. We have another title by Hernandez in the collection, as you may have seen, entitled Love and Rockets: new stories. Some of the titles you have suggested are currently out-of-print such as Hey, Wait by Jason but we will keep them on our list as possible future acquisitions.

Our Graphic Novel Collection is just over a year old and we have been very pleased to see the interest it has garnered with our students. As with our popular paperback collection, we are not aiming to develop a comprehensive collection but a select collection of highly reviewed titles.

Thank you for your suggestions and please continue to let us know of others.

Cindy Francis, Collection Development Librarian
November, 2010


Suggestion:
I think it would be beneficial if the library could be open at least one day a week until 11 pm. My roommates are loud and trying to get those late night assignments done is hard when its loud.

Response:

Thanks for your suggestion. We do hear that the dorms can be lively places, and we like to be a relatively quiet alternative on evenings and weekends.

Over the past couple years we've added earlier opening times, and expanded service to 7 days per week by adding highly requested Sunday hours. We do offer extended hours (until 11:00PM) the week before final exams each semester, but we currently don’t have the overall level of demand or late night attendance to support a regular later weekday closing time. One late night per week is an interesting alternative, but I suspect it would be very difficult to find the "right" night to suit all. We will keep monitoring attendance and requests, and we work closely with the SGA (Student Government Association) to consider and discuss proposals for adjusting services to meet student needs.

Nina Warren, Library Director
March, 2010


Suggestion:
I enjoy the graphic novels and wouldn't mind seeing more on the shelves. The collection as it stands is good but it is still small.

Response:

Thank you for your interest in the library's new Graphic Novel Collection. We have added the collection in response to student and faculty requests, and will be adding more titles soon. If you have any title suggestions please let us know.

Cindy Francis, Collection Development Librarian
November, 2009


Suggestion:
Please let me know what the library's policy on children is?

Response:

Children are allowed in the library under the direct supervision of a parent or guardian. We interpret that to mean within your eyesight at all times. This is for their safety.

All individuals are expected to behave appropriately in the library, children included. Children (or any library patron) should not create a disruption for other library users, or engage in behavior that is a danger to themselves or others, for example, running or climbing on furniture or bookshelves.

The library’s practices are guided by GCC Campus Procedure 418, Children on Campus.

-Nina Warren, Director of Library Services
April, 2008


Suggestion:
I love coming to the library to get work done except for the amount of talking that goes on. Then I have no quiet place to start my homework or get research done. When I do ask that people to at least relocate their conversation they refuse, give me attitude and then I'm the one that moves only to have keep asking others to be quiet. I know that I am not the only one who feels this way as it has been discussed in many of my classes.

Response:

We understand your concern! However, libraries today are no longer silent. Students need to work on group projects, librarians need to give instruction, even checking out a book creates noise.

We have tried to provide areas for those who prefer quiet. There are individual study desks on the far side of the circulating book stacks (the area to your right as you enter the library). All those rows of books absorb the noise and it is very quiet back there. Try using one of those study desks.

There are four study rooms, too. Although group use takes priority, they can be used by an individual who wants less distraction. The rooms are available on a “first come first served basis.” Again, an individual would be asked to vacate the room if a group needed it.

This fall we will be piloting a “Yacker Tracker” device to keep noise levels down. Three traffic light signals will be placed in the library. As noise increases, the lights change from green for OK to red for too much sound. We hope that this visual warning will encourage students to keep their voices down.

If you experience students being loud and disturbing the work of others, please come to the Information Desk and report the situation. If you are reluctant to do this, you can go to the “Ask a Librarian” link on the library homepage, start a chat and let us know of the problem. A reference librarian will then quiet things down.

Please stop by the Information Desk the next time you are in the library and we will be glad to show you where we think are the quietest places to work! And please spread the word to your classmates that quiet spots exist!!

-Anita Whitehead, Reference Services Librarian
October, 2008


Suggestion:
Why can't the computers in the library have open office. I can't afford Microsoft word and use open office at home because it's free. But Word won't read open office so I can't do work in the library with text documents.

Response:

Thank you for your suggestion. OpenOffice and other open-source software like Google Docs are useful tools for many individuals. In the future, open-source software may become more widely used in academic institutions and business settings. However, the current and most widely accepted standard (especially in the business world) remains Microsoft's Office suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.) National and local businesses often look to fill positions with individuals who have experience with the specific programs used in the field and proficiency with Microsoft Office products remains in high demand. As such, Genesee supports Microsoft Office products on campus workstations. Also, the college bookstore offers students versions of Microsoft Office at special discounted rates.

However, you can work on text documents in the library that you began at home using OpenOffice without purchasing Microsoft Word. You can do this by saving your work to a program called Notepad that comes pre-loaded on all Windows PCs. To open a Notepad file, click on Start, then click on All Programs, then click on Accessories, then select Notepad. From your home computer, highlight all of the text in the OpenOffice document you are working on copy it into a Notepad file using Copy and Paste. Then save the Notepad file to a disk or thumb drive. You will then be able to open the Notepad document from the library PCs. Then simply Copy and Paste the contents of the Notepad (.txt) file into a Microsoft Word file. You will lose some formatting (font type, size, margins, etc.) but this process will allow you to complete work here that you started on your home PC.

If you need any assistance with the process described above, please contact the Information Desk and we will be happy to help.

-Andrew M. Kloc, Systems & Electronic Services Librarian
May, 2008


Suggestion:
Keep the library classroom a bit colder when there is a class in there; it's the perfect temperature to fall asleep in and it makes it difficult to stay awake. I'm not asking to pump the a/c, but at least keep it colder in there if the door is going to be shut.

Response:

We know that the classroom temperature can vary widely during certain times of the year. We've adjusted the airflow and A/C system several times, and we do monitor it. We have several fans in place, so feel free to ask the librarian to turn on one or more of them if you are getting uncomfortably warm. Also, although it seems counterintuitive, keeping the door SHUT actually IMPROVES the airflow in the room. (Really! I didn't believe it either, but we tested it, and it's a fact.) Thanks for the input - we'll keep working on it.

-Nina Warren, Director of Library Services
March, 2008


Suggestion:
There should be more writing contests & art contests.

Response:

Thank you very much for your suggestion!

The library hosts many art exhibits that feature the work of GCC students, but they are not juried shows or contests. We are very reluctant to become art judges.

Each year the Library runs a student poetry contest and the essay contest for the A Tale for Three Counties reading program. Both of these are Spring events and we're interested in something for the Fall semester. Do you happen to have anything in mind? We would gladly consider a suggestion.

However, with our small staff and limited time available to conduct library programs, we are only considering one additional contest at this time. If you are serious about a considerable increase in the number of contests, perhaps we could help you find other offices or departments that would sponsor new activities. We would be pleased to work with you in this endeavor.

-Anita Whitehead, Reference Services Librarian
March, 2008


Suggestion:
You should really consider sanitizing the computer workstations (especially the keyboards) throughout the entire day. With the flu and cold season under way there are MANY germs on this area. The keyboards are always greasy and so disturbing!

Response:

Thank you for your suggestion! GCC puts a high priority on the health and wellness of the entire Genesee community, and the library is no exception. Your suggestion to sanitize the computer workstations throughout the day raises several important points. First, please be aware that there is no easy way to sanitize a PC. Disinfectant sprays cannot be used as the direct moisture can do serious damage to PC components. In fact, the only way to effectively clean a PC is to wipe every component (mouse, keyboard, monitor) down with a soap-and-water moist microfiber cloth. While we do strive to clean all our PCs before each semester and several times during the course of each semester, this is not a task that could practically be performed on a daily basis because all of the computers are in constant, heavy use.

As such, we recommend all public computer users take precautions to prevent the spread of germs. First and foremost, take special care to wash your hands before and after using any public computer workstation. At the very least, carry and use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to reduce the risk of infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), handwashing is the “single most important factor in preventing the spread of dangerous germs.” Also, do not eat or drink while using any public computer workstations (library rules also prohibit this.) Physicians currently believe many germs also enter the body from eating or drinking in unsanitary conditions.

We share your concerns regarding the health of all library users and staff, and appreciate your comments. We believe following these guidelines can help reduce your exposure to harmful germs and bacteria. We will also conduct a full cleaning of all library computer workstations over the next several weeks.

-Andrew M. Kloc, Systems & Electronic Services Librarian
February, 2008


Suggestion:
There are signs all over saying no using cell phones in the library. I think the best way to enforce this is to have some one walk around once in a while because every time I come to the library someone is talking on their cell phone, sometimes even using foul language. There has to be a better way to control this, especially since students are just not considerate of other people.

Response:

Enforcing the cell phone ban is one of the hardest things reference librarians have to do. We want to be friendly and approachable so that students ask for our help. Instead we end up policing people talking on cell phones. Requests to stop using a cell are often met with disbelief or hostility. Or the user comes up with some ingenious excuse like "It's a job interview" or "It's my mother calling me."

We hoped that numerous signs would decrease the use of cell phones. Looks like we need to be more proactive.

Feel free to let the reference desk know when you notice cell phone abuse in the library. If you feel uncomfortable coming to the desk, just open a Chat with us and mention the problem and your location.

Thanks for taking the time to report this issue. We will try harder!

-Anita Whitehead, Reference Services Librarian
February, 2008


Suggestion:
Could the library please ban the use of ipod's and mp3 players? I have came to the library to study for tests three times in the last three weeks only to have to move from my spots because students are playing their personal music players way too loud. Thank you.

Response:

Thank you very much for your suggestion. For many students, the ideal study location is calm and silent, whereas for others, having background music is their idea of the perfect arrangement. iPods and MP3 players should not be a problem when they are used considerately. We strive to create an atmosphere in the library that encourages respect - respect of yourself, each other and this place. This means keeping all noise levels down and the librarians do walk through the library routinely when we feel that general sound levels are getting too high. There are sections within the library that are more quiet than others, such as the study rooms (though groups do have priority use of these rooms), the media room - if no one is using it to watch a video/DVD - and the carrels along the walls of the Circulating book collection. If you find yourself near students who are being too loud, either through talking or with an iPod/MP3 player, please let the librarian(s) on duty know so that we can ask the offending students to lower their sound level. It can be hard to tell what is too loud from where they sit at the Information Desk.

We hope you will continue to use the library and help us to create a pleasant experience for everyone.

-Nicki Lerczak, Head of Reference & Instruction
February, 2007


Suggestion:
Can you please stay open later? Maybe by ½ an hour or even let the printers stay on a bit later.

Response Update:

We do offer extended hours (until 11:00PM) the week before final exams each semester, but we currently don’t have the level of demand or resources to enable a regular later closing time.

However, requests from students for earlier hours were great enough and we were able to respond with existing staff, so we are now open at 7:30 a.m. Monday - Friday during semesters.

Over many semesters we have learned that printers must be turned off at least 15 minutes before closing to provide the best experience for all library users. This enables the students to finish any remaining computer work after printing and to pack up, without the stress of having to beat the clock. An agreeable end to a productive day!

-Your library staff
February, 2007


Suggestion:
As long as certain History professors at Genesee require us to use Chicago Based Citation Format, is there any way you can get some links and materials for this? I went online but keep finding as many different versions of Chicago as there are squirrels in this town. It would be really helpful, please and thank you.

Response Update:
A new GCC Stylesheet for Chicago citation is now available at the Information Desk or online at our Citation page.

Of course, please stop at the Information Desk in the library for assistance. Thanks for your input --

-Nina Warren, Librarian - Systems & Electronic Resources
September, 2006


Suggestion:
Can you put dividers between the computers? I hate it when I know someone is reading what I'm writing.

Response:
Our current tables are not well suited to installing dividers, but we are looking ahead to creating more diverse computer workstation arrangements for both individual and group collaboration as we explore the concept of transforming the library into an Information Commons. We'll be looking for more input from you and other library users as we move forward in that process.

For right now, though, you may want to use one of the 4 study rooms, the computer in the legal area (when Paralegal students are not using it,) or aim for an end seat and angle your monitor to the side.

-Your library staff
October, 2006


Suggestion:
It would be helpful for the librarians to 'round' the computer stations and enforce the noise compliance. As I sit here today; I am subjected to conversations that included personal information, as well as insults about instructors from 2 tables over. The guy sitting next to me is using his cell phone. I advocate for myself; but am met with resistance. Thanks for letting me vent!!

Response:

We hear you.

Noise in the library is our number one complaint. And while you can understand the need for students to talk quietly while collaborating on a course assignment, it is quite another thing to have to listen to rude behavior, which is what you are describing.

The reference librarians are well aware of this problem and I know they do their best to maintain order and do the “rounds” you refer to. If you do not see this happening, please feel free to approach the librarian on duty and request s/he talk with the offenders. We also have the option of calling a public safety officer if we need further assistance.

Your comment has been forwarded to Nicki Lerczak, our head of reference, so she can share this with the reference staff.

Thank you for taking the time to contact us about your concern.

-Judy Sikora, Library Director
September, 2006


Suggestion:
Place holes in sides of study carrels or mounts in order to put laptop lock cables on.

Response:
Excellent suggestion, thanks. We see more and more laptops being used in the library, and we're interested in providing more security options for users. We'll be doing a pilot installation of security base plates during Summer 06.

Of course, no means of securing a portable device can prevent all theft or vandalism. We continue to urge all patrons to exercise caution and to keep an eye on all the materials and devices you bring into the library.

-Nina Warren, Librarian - Systems & Electronic Resources
April, 2006

Update: Security base plates have been installed in 10 study carrels along the West wall of the library.


Suggestion:
Power strips for computers at desks. That would be great!

Response:
We assume you're referring to power options for portable and laptop computers, and agree that supporting mobile users is a growing need. (See the April suggestion below about security for laptops below.)

Here's what's currently available:

  • all of the 32 oak study carrels in the middle of the library have 3 power outlets in a strip right next to the light switch, under their bookshelves.
  • there are 42 power outlets along the west wall (and north west corner walls) of the library by the beige laminate study carrels.

We're considering how to best provide appropriate power outlets at the center oak reading tables. We know they are a nice place to work!

As a related reminder, laptop users are advised to utilize surge control devices appropriate for their equipment when plugging in to any college outlet.

-Nina Warren, Librarian - Systems & Electronic Resources
May, 2006


Suggestion:
Please buy Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. There is too much testosterone amongst college students for this not to be in your collection.

Response:
Thanks for your suggestion! We will order Fight Club.

[This suggestion was signed by the student who submitted it, and he was notified when the book was ordered.]

-Cindy Francis, Collection Development Librarian
April, 2006

Update: Fight Club has arrived, and is part of our circulating collection.


Suggestion:
More film magazines --

Response:
Thank you for your suggestion for more film magazines. If there was something specific you wanted us to add to the collection, or if there was a particular area of film that you felt was underrepresented I would be happy to discuss it with you.

Our periodical collection attempts to support the variety of courses that are taught here at Genesee. We used to subscribe to Literature Film Quarterly and Film Quarterly, but we decided not to renew them back in 2002 due to a lack of use. We still subscribe to Film Comment.

As a reminder, if you look at a magazine or journal from the library’s periodical lounge, I urge you not to reshelve it yourself, but rather to place it in one of the racks for us to reshelve it. We use these important reshelving/use statistics when renewing periodical subscriptions.

Thanks!

-Nicki Lerczak, Head of Reference & Instruction Services
May, 2006


Comment:
I truly enjoyed the book signing and discussions of A Northern Light. It was a wonderful experience.

Response:
Your feedback on our annual "Tale for Three Counties" programming is very important to the committee and I’ll be sure to include it in our evaluation. We provide a survey and comment form at the end of each event for this very reason and I'm sorry that you didn't get one! Thank you for making the extra effort to contact us and we hope to see you at next year’s event.

-Tracy Paradis, PT Reference Librarian, Tale for Three Counties Project Team member
April, 2006


Suggestion:
The librarians on email are awesome! They've given me lots of help and found me articles when I've been working at home.

Response:
Thanks! The reference librarians appreciate your comments, and are always happy to help.

-Your library staff
March, 2005


Question:
Question: Do you have books on Bruno Giordano?

Response:
Currently the library does not have titles by Giordano but in the Literature Resource Center (LRC) database there are entries for him in the literary criticism, article, and works overview sections. There is also an historical timeline of his life.

To access the LRC, start from the library webpage:

  • Click on Databases A-Z under Find Articles and Databases
  • From the Databases A-Z page, scroll down and click on Literature Resource Center
  • From the LRC page, enter Giordano Bruno in the author search window
  • From the results page, click on the highlighted tabs and links to entries

Hope this helps your search for Bruno Giordano info. I checked books by him and most are out-of-print. We may be able to get them thru Interlibrary Loan. Please stop by at the information desk and the librarian can assist you.

-Cindy Francis, Collection Development Librarian
March, 2006


Suggestion:
I am becoming annoyed at seeing students sprawled out on the couch w/jackets on top like it is a bed. I like the couch because of back problems. It’s more comfortable to read. I can understand someone sitting upright and falling asleep. But this is no accident. I am also annoyed when I watch the staff just walk by with that sort of “Aw, how cute” look.
Is this going to stop?
I need a comfortable place to study.

Response:
Be it good or bad, the atmosphere of the library, on many levels, lends itself to dozing off. Should both couches be taken up by a sleeping student/patron you are more than welcome to let us know and we can wake them up for you.

Might we also suggest the individual chairs which are extremely supportive and are very comfortable. They are placed throughout the library giving you an option of a more private retreat.

As far as staff reactions to sleeping students let us just say this, you can’t judge a book by its cover!

-Your library staff
March, 2006