Login:

Genesee Course Listing

Official Course Information

Please select a Course Section from the List below or use Search for a class by Title.

Summer 2017

Philosophy Courses:

  or   List All Philosophy Courses
PHI101 - Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 3

Catalog Description: Introduces major ideas and philosophers of the Western Hemisphere. Defines and analyzes a number of these ideas and develops a historical progression.

Lecture: 3 hrs.

Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs):
Upon successful completion of this course, as documented by journal entries, quizzes, class discussion, and a major paper, students will be able to:

1.identify at least eight major Western philosophers and describe the essence of those philosophers' arguments, in order to demonstrate introductory knowledge and recognition of the foundational writing in the field of philosophy;
2.place important Western philosophers within a cultural or social context in order to demonstrate the ability to discern the influence of culture/the historical period on the individual philosopher;
3.discuss philosophical issues from three points of view (reason, experience, and reality), and from the viewpoints of at least two different Western philosophers, to demonstrate the ability to approach problems from a variety of established theoretical viewpoints;
4.describe and discuss basic philosophical ideas such as knowledge, reason, truth, mind, freedom, destiny, identity, God, goodness, and justice, in order to demonstrate the capacity to state ideas accurately, as well as to demonstrate methodical/critical thinking;
5.*Complete a 1600 word MLA-style research paper demonstrating an ability to examine answers to a major philosophical question by drawing from ideas proposed by historically significant philosophers and then to reflect on those ideas, to show ability to recognize and apply philosophical ideas.

*This course objective has been identified as a student learning outcome that must be formally assessed as part of the College's Comprehensive Assessment Plan. All faculty teaching this course must collect the required data (see Assessing Student Learning Outcomes form) and submit the required analysis and documentation at the conclusion of the semester to the Office of Assessment and Special Projects.




Content Outline:
I. DEFINING PHILOSOPHY and ARGUMENT
A. What is Philosophy?
B. What is argument?
C. Some Characteristics of a Philosophical Problem
D. Some Characteristics of a Philosophical Argument

II. INTRODUCING MAJOR WESTERN PHILOSOPHERS
A. Introduce each philosopher
B. Present essence of philosopher's argument

III. CONTEXTUALIZING PHILOSOPHERS
A. Place each philosopher in his political, geographical, social and cultural context
B. Examine some influences of the contexts upon the ideas and arguments

IV. PRESENTING PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES
A. Viewpoint of Reason
B. Viewpoint of Experience
C. Viewpoint of Reality

V. EXPLORATION OF and REFLECTION UPON IDEAS
A. What is Knowledge?
B. What is Reason?
C. What is Truth?
D. What is Mind?
E. What is Freedom?
F. What is Destiny?
G. What is Identity?
H. What is God?
I. What is Goodness?
J. What is Justice?




Effective Term: Fall 2006