Genesee Community College

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Official Course Information

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Fall 2012

American Sign Language Courses:

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ASL202 - American Sign Language 4
Credits: 3

Catalog Description: Continues the development of receptive and expressive communication skills in American Sign Language. Compares and contrasts ASL and English grammar and discourse resulting in the production and interpretation of a clearly detailed story. Expands knowledge of Gloss Notation, introduces the linguistics of ASL and reviews Deaf history and culture from pre-history to the present. Substantial portions of the class will be taught in ASL. Prerequisite: ASL 201, or the completion of an assessment test given by the instructor. Instructor determines final placement.


Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs):
At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Identify the five parts of a sign and describe the importance of each part.

2. *Take a written English article or story and translate it to ASL.

3. *Take an ASL discourse and present it in English, both orally and in writing.

4. Watch an ASL presentation and write it using Gloss Notation.

5. Discuss the evolution of Deaf history and culture from pre-history to the present.

* This course objective has been identified as a student learning outcome that must be formally assessed as part of the College's Comprehensive Assessment Plan. All faculty teaching this course must collect the required data (see Assessing Student Learning Outcomes form) And submit the required analysis and documentation at the conclusion of the semester to the Office of Assessment and Special Projects.




Content Outline:
I. Videotaped introductions, self evaluation of signing skills.

II. The five parts of a sign and their significance.

III. Analyzing a sign's parts.

IV. Learning and identifying ASL grammatical order

V. Learning and using Gloss notation

VI. Contrasting ASL and English discourse

VII. Analyzing an ASL story

VIII. Translating an ASL story into English

IX. Analyzing an English story

X. Translating an English story into ASL

XI. Deaf History: Pre Milan

XII. Deaf History: Post Milan

XIII. Deaf History: Oralism vs. Manualism

XIV. Deaf History: Communication Enriched Environments

XV. Deaf History: Comparing and contrasting differing versions of Deaf History





Effective Term: Spring 2008